Video Tag: Lecture

The Burning of His Majesty’s Schooner Gaspee

Steven Park
June 9, 2022

On June 9, 1772, a group of prominent Rhode Islanders rowed out to the British schooner Gaspee, which had run aground six miles south of Providence while on an anti-smuggling patrol. After threatening and shooting its commanding officer, the raiders looted the vessel and burned it to the waterline. Despite colony-wide sympathy for the raid, neither […]

America’s Revolutionary Mind: A Moral History of the American Revolution

C. Bradley Thompson
April 27, 2022

The American Revolution was a watershed in the principles of government between centuries of monarchical and aristocratic rule and free societies based on moral principles that shaped the Revolutionary ideal of universal equality. Professor Thompson, author of America’s Revolutionary Mind: A Moral History of the American Revolution and the Declaration that Defined It, explores the logic […]

The Untold War at Sea: America’s Revolutionary Privateers

Kylie Hulbert
February 3, 2022

Action at sea played a critical role in European and Anglo-American conflicts throughout the eighteenth century. Yet the oft-told narrative of the American Revolution tends to focus on battles on American soil or the debates and decisions of the Continental Congress. The Untold War at Sea is the first book to place American privateers and their experiences […]

Surviving the Winters: Housing Washington’s Army during the American Revolution

Steven Elliott
December 2, 2021

George Washington and his Continental Army braving the frigid winter at Valley Forge forms an iconic image in the popular history of the American Revolution. Such winter camps were also a critical factor in waging and winning the War of Independence. Exploring the inner workings of the Continental Army through the prism of its encampments, Surviving […]

George Washington, the Society of the Cincinnati, and the Origins of American Neutrality

Sandra Moats
November 16, 2021

George Washington and his cabinet issued the Neutrality Proclamation in 1793 to shield the United States from European warfare. This proclamation owed its existence to numerous sources, including Washington’s military experiences and European diplomatic precedents. A lesser known, but highly influential, inspiration came from the Society of the Cincinnati, whose French members had served alongside […]

Religion and the American Revolution: An Imperial History

Katherine Carté
September 14, 2021

For most of the eighteenth century, British Protestantism was driven neither by the primacy of denominations nor by fundamental discord between them. Instead, it thrived as part of a complex transatlantic system that bound religious institutions to imperial politics. As Dr. Carté argues, British imperial Protestantism proved remarkably effective in advancing both the interests of […]

Image of Regulators in Pre-Revolutionary North Carolina.

The Regulator Rebellion in Pre-Revolutionary North Carolina

Marjoleine Kars
August 24, 2021

Years before shots rang out at Lexington and Concord, backcountry settlers in the North Carolina Piedmont launched their own defiant bid for economic independence and political liberty. The Regulator Rebellion of 1766-1771 arose from the conflict created by competing ideologies and goals between the religious outlook of evangelical Protestants and mainstream Anglicans; between the aspirations […]

Image of "The Pensioner" used in the presentation on "America's First Veterans."

America’s First Veterans

Jack D. Warren, Jr.
January 13, 2021

Executive Director Jack Warren discusses America’s First Veterans, a book published by the American Revolution Institute of the Society of the Cincinnati. Using eighty-five manuscripts, rare books, prints, broadsides, paintings and other artifacts, America’s First Veterans introduces the stories of the men—and some women—who bore arms in the Revolutionary War. The book follows their fate in […]

T. Cole Jones spoke about his book, Captives of Liberty, dealing with prisoners of war, at the American Revolution Institute.

Prisoners of War in the American Revolution

T. Cole Jones
February 27, 2020

Prisoners of war presented an enormous challenge for Patriot forces during the American Revolution. Patriots captured more than seventeen thousand enemy soldiers during the war. At times the prisoners in American hands outnumbered the Continental Army. At the outset of the war, Americans treated British prisoners in accordance with the conventions of eighteenth-century warfare, but the […]

Dr. Chip Bragg is a member of the Society of the Cincinnati and an authority on the Burr-Hamilton duel.

A Fratricidal Affair of Honor: Reactions to the Burr-Hamilton Duel

Cordell Lee Bragg
June 7, 2018

The Hamilton-Burr duel has become one of the most infamous altercations in U.S. history.  Officers in the Revolutionary War and original members of the Society of the Cincinnati—Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr squared off in Weehawken, New Jersey, in the hours of the early morning on July 11, 1804. Although Hamilton led the Society as […]

Professor Rod Andrew is the author The Life and Times of Andrew Pickens.

Andrew Pickens: War Hero and Founder

Rod Andrew
January 23, 2018

Andrew Pickens (1739–1817) was the hero of many American Revolution victories against British and Loyalist forces. Rod Andrew vividly depicts the hard-fighting South Carolina militia commander founding churches, acquiring slaves, struggling over Indian territorial boundaries on the southern frontier and joining the patriot cause. Combining insights from military and social history, Andrew argues that while […]

Nathaniel Philbrick presents a lecture about the Battle of Bunker Hill at the Boston Athenaeum.

Bunker Hill: A City, A Siege, A Revolution

Nathaniel Philbrick
May 20, 2014

Nathaniel Philbrick brings a fresh perspective to the Battle of Bunker Hill. The real central character in this battle is Boston—where vigilantes fill the streets with a sinister and frightening violence, even as calmer patriots struggle to see their way to rebellion. The core of Philbrick’s lecture, building on his book Bunker Hill: A City, a […]

David Fisher discusses George Washington’s crossing of the Delaware River on Christmas in 1776 as a turning point in the Revolutionary War.

From George Washington’s Crossing to Victory in Princeton

David Hackett Fischer
May 10, 2013

In summer of 1776, George Washington suffered many crushing defeats and lost 90 percent of the army under his command. British and Hessian forces had recovered much of  New York, New Jersey and Rhode Island. By late November, thousands of Americans took an oath of allegiance to George III. Leaders on both sides believed that […]

Gordon Wood and Gordon Wood and Steven Pincus discuss the British national debt and the political economic forces in the British Empire that led to the American Revolution.

The Political Path to Revolution and War, 1760-1776

Gordon Wood and Steven Pincus
May 9, 2013

Why did the British government pass the Stamp Act, the Townshend Duties, the Tea Act and the Intolerable Acts? Why did they pass a series of measures seemingly calculated to offend and provoke North American colonists? These measures cannot be fully understood without taking into account a profound political economic debate taking place across the […]

Historian Robert Allison discusses the coming of the American Revolution in Massachusetts that led to war.

The Coming of the Revolution in Massachusetts

Robert Allison
January 15, 2013

Did events in the Massachusetts colony make the American Revolution inevitable? The people of Massachusetts had more power over their own government than anyone else in the British empire. As the British crown raised taxes on American goods and soldiers arrived to enforce new polices, the independent minded colonists in Massachusetts became embittered and resentful. Rising tensions […]